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The Doobie Brothers Tickets, Tour Dates and Concerts
The Doobie Brothers Tickets, Tour Dates and Concerts

The Doobie BrothersVerified

868,244 Followers
• 38 Upcoming Shows
38 Upcoming Shows
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Concerts and tour dates

Upcoming
Past

The Doobie Brothers merchamazonview store

Minute By Minute
$87.49
Rockin Down The Highway
$11.10
Stampede Audiophile Limited Anniversa...
$69.00
Takin' It To The Streets
$60.00
World Gone Crazy
$19.65
Best Of The Doobie Brothers Live
$7.34
Sibling Rivalry
$45.52
The Doobie Brothers Best Of
$4.28
The Very Best Of
$17.70
Brotherhood
$17.14
Best of Doobie Brothers 2
$7.19
The Captain and Me
$9.99
Cycles
$14.18
View All
The Doobie Brothers's tour

Live Photos of The Doobie Brothers

The Doobie Brothers at Kelowna, BC in Prospera Place 2023
View All Photos

Fan Reviews

Kirk
October 9th 2023
Absolutely excellent show! These guys gave it their all and didn’t disappoint one bit! Just about every hit was played and then some plus a great version of “I Heard It Through The Grapevine” and played an incredible version of Steely Dan’s “Pretzel Logic” as the final song of the encore. This was my third time seeing them, first was for their Farewell Tour in the 80s, then about 5-10yrs ago at the Fillmore in SF. They always put on a great show and was extremely pleased to see them for what could be the last time. These guys sounded as good as ever. I would definitely go again if they are still touring. Thank you Doobie Brothers!!!
Uncasville, CT@
Mohegan Sun Arena
DAve
September 8th 2023
The Doobie Brothers: 9/6/23 “I took it to the streets rocking down the highway —destination Simpsonville South Carolina, 416 days after seeing the Doobies last in Atlanta. It was my my fifth time seeing my number 4 all-time favrite band LIVE and also my 3rd time seeing them with Michael McDonald, the first time going back to July of ’81. I’ve also seen Michael solo twice in between. An extension of the tour billed as ‘The 50th Anniversary Tour’ was now well into the fifty-second year since the release of their first album in 1971. With 15 studio albums and 32 charted singles the three frontmen who led the charge this evening were all in their 70’s: Patrick Simmons 74, John McFee 72, and the baby of the bunch Michael McDonald 71. To me it really didn’t matter how the set list would play out as I own all 15 albums and am familiar with all their songs. However much to my dismay after purchasing my tickets Tom Johnston announced that he would not be joining the band on this leg of the tour. The 75 year old voice of the majority of their earlier hits cited that he would undergo surgery to target severe back pain making it impossible. All in all, it wasn’t a dealbreaker as I’ve seen many members of the band at least one time: Johnston, Simmons, McDonald, McFee, Hossack, Knudsen, LaKind, McCracken, Weeks & Bumpus. Sadly I have missed out on seeing a few LIVE: Porter, Hartman & Baxter. I was under the expectation that I was going to see the exact same show as my 2022 Atlanta excursion this evening but was pleasantly surprised at the changes to the set. Late Summer heat described the weather at the uncovered outdoor amphitheater, however the bright sunshine quickly diffused toward evening as the daytime high of 94° began to drop. Back in May I had grabbed my general admission lawn seats during LIVE Nation’s $25 all in special, and receiving a free upgrade to row 10 at the door I made my way towards the front for a view of the stage. The stage disclosed a rather simple set up with the video screens the band typically travels with notably absent which is unfortunately a consistent happening for this venue which also have none of their own. There was a large black and gold classic logo backdrop with the wording ‘50th Anniversary Tour’, the image and wording appeared on the drum head as well. A pedal steel for ’South City Midnight Lady’ and Michael’s keys were both positioned stage left. At 7:30 p.m. the 3 members of the band from San Jose California along with 4 touring musicians took the stage for a 2 hour and 15 minute / 25 song set beginning with 1975’s #11 from their ’Stampede’ album ‘Take Me in Your Arms (Rock Me a Little While)’. Patrick took the lead on vocals as he would on ‘Long Train Runnin’ and ‘China Groove’ in lieu of Johnston and he nailed the guitar solo album perfect. The next two songs ‘Here To Love You’ and ‘Dependin’ On You’ featured McDonald on vocals. One of the things that made this show special were the additions to set list the band would not typically perform without Michael. In addition to ‘Here To Love You’ and ‘Dependin’ On You’ interdispersed throughout the evening were: ‘You Belong To Me, ‘It Keeps You Runnin’, ‘One Step Closer’, ‘Real Love’, and ‘Minute By Minute’. Next on the set was ‘Rockin' Down The Highway’, this time touring bass player John Cowan took the lead in place of Tom. Patrick addressed the audience, ‘Simpsonville South Carolina so great to be here this evening. We are the Doobie Brothers. We’re just gonna keep going we’re just kinda getting warmed up here. This is a song from an album entitled Stampede, a song called “Neal’s Fandango”’. With Cowan on lead vocals again the song featured John McFee’s exceptional pedal steel guitar skills which typically are only heard later in the set during ‘South City Midnight Lady’. McDonald arose from his keyboard for the first time and walked center stage with a mandolin in hand. Patrick announced, ‘We’re gonna do this one Hawaiian style’. With Michael positioned between SImmons and McFee the trio performed the instrumental ‘Slack Key Soquel Rag’. Pat ended the song with an exclamation of gratitude to the audience, ‘Mahalo!’ Full band Introductions followed 1973’s ‘Clear As The Driven Snow’. The touring musicians were introduced first: John Cowan 70 on bass (formerly New Grass Revival), Marc Quiñones on percussion (formerly Gregg Allman Band), Ed Toth on drums since ’05, and Marc Russo on sax. Marc a former Tower Of Power member with an impressive studio resume was granted free-range of the stage strolling from side to side energizing the crowd, his long hair blowing at the slightest breeze. Patrick then introduced John, ‘So um, John’s the new guy, he joined us in 1978’, then Michael, ‘a wonderful guy and a fabulous musician’. Michael a man of few words replied, ‘For me it’s a great thrill to be back here on stage with my old friends for fifty years now and play these songs that I’ve missed playing for s long’, then he introduced Patrick. Oddly there wasn’t a mention of Tom Johnston all evening long, as if he didn’t exist! A surprise addition since the Atlanta show followed, a cover of Gladys Knight’s ‘I Heard It Through The Grapevine’ which was actually covered by McDonald in 2003 on his solo release ’Motown’. All evening long McDonald’s uniquely-soulful vocals were strong, at times singing slightly off tempo but in clear control, establishing his own pace and direction. In retrospect, this was most likely due to years of headlining solo performances. Instead of including three brand new songs like they did on the Atlanta set, the band chose only one ‘Better Days’ from ‘Liberte’. Sounding bright and clear the song was well received with a round of applause. The band saved their earlier hits for last as the regular set began to take it’s turn towards conclusion. There was ‘Without You’ with Patrick on lead, ‘Jesus Is Just Alright’ which drew the loudest cheers of the entire evening, 1979’s #1 ‘What A Fool Believes’ and ‘Long Train Runnin' featuring John on harmonica. ‘China Grove’ ended the regular set. There was a definitive R&B feel about the songs (even the non-McDonald led ones) that one could not get from needle to vinyl alone and the audience wanted more to which the band delivered! Beginning with 1974’s #1 ‘Black Water’ the band came on for a four song / half hour encore! By now my wife Michele and I had moved our way up to the second row center stage occupying a pair of seats abandoned by a couple of patrons who had vacated at the end of the regular set! As John and Pat came up front with fiddle and guitar for the chorus, they changed up the words to the delight of the crowd, ‘Carolina moon won’t you keep on shinin’ on me’! It took an hour and forty-five minutes until the smoke from the back made it’s way up to the front. It had finally arrived and the pungent haze lingered on all throughout the encore. ‘This next song is dedicated to our good friend Jimmy Buffett, looking down on us right now, sittin’ there drinking a Margareta having a cheeseburger. We need to sing it really loud so Jimmy can hear it up there at the Cantina.’ Ensuing was a six and a half minute rendering of 1976’s ‘Takin’ It To The Streets’ that began in a jazzy keyboard and sax intro to the tune of ‘Still Crazy After All These Years’ then evolved in somewhat of a New Orleans funeral style. Bassist John Cowan once again took the lead vocals and did an outstanding job. What an honor bestowed on him to have the privilege of singing the iconic anthem! ‘Should we play one more? This is basically kind of a jam on a Steely Dan tune… all you die hards that want to stick around we’re gonna stretch this one out a little bit.’ A little bit? The song turned into a ten and a half minute rendering of ‘Pretzel Logic’ featuring guitar solos first by Pat, then John, then the two of them together ending with Pat holding his guitar over his head hammering on the the whammy bar! The night ended with a full band upfront bow and drum stick and pick toss out. We all left feeling pretty good —just as the legend of the doobie goes. Back in the 1950’s jazz clubs when one musician would call to another, ‘How you feelin’, are you doin’ good?’ The reply came, ‘I do be, I do be good!’ Inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame last year the band has stood the test of time despite line-up changes and musical styles. Who knows what will happen, will Michael stay? Amazingly until now he had only been a member a mere 7 years of the band’s history (’75-’82). One thing’s for sure, in the now, the Doobies are still very much ‘fired-up’ and it’s unlikely they’ll be hanging their instruments up any time in the near future!” Review and photo(s) by DAve (Concert #817)
Simpsonville, SC@
CCNB Amphitheatre at Heritage Park
Eddie
September 8th 2023
The show was incredible. Third time seeing the Doobie Brothers. They never disappoint. Tom Johnston was missing, but they still out in a heck of a show. White Oak Amphitheater not so much. They definitely oversold on lawn tickets. Took an hour or more for most of ticket holders to get in. If we go to this facility again, we will definitely buy seats. I like the layout, but the amphitheaters in Charlotte and Raleigh are more organized and don’t have to pay extra for parking.
Greensboro, NC@
White Oak Amphitheatre
View More Fan Reviews

About The Doobie Brothers

ABOUT THE DOOBIE BROTHERS

Born out of Northern California’s chaotic, late-1960s musical stew, The Doobie Brothers’ rugged, real and authentic approach to rock and roll made them biker bar stalwarts. But their self-titled debut album in ’71 went beyond just leather and motorcycles, revealing even more musical layers; sweet three-part harmonies and rootsy, introspective, acoustic flavors.

The Doobie Brothers’ legacy has been built upon not just hit records, but also an unrivaled commitment to musical integrity and a steadfast allegiance to their enthusiastic fan base. The bands ability to evolve in a constantly changing industry and connections to generations of listening audiences is a testament to their craft.

It all began in 1969, when a drummer named John Hartman arrived in Northern California. He was there to meet Skip Spence from the band Moby Grape and become part of a supposed band reunion that never quite got off the ground. But it wasn’t all for naught. Spence (who had also played in the Jefferson Airplane) introduced Hartman to his friend Tom Johnston, a local singer/songwriter/guitarist -and they connected. Hartman and Johnston began playing local Bay Area bars. They soon met singer/guitarist Pat Simmons, whose finger-style playing richly complimented Johnston’s R&B strumming-style, and the foundation for The Doobie Brothers was set.

While their debut album in 1971 did not chart, just a year a later, their second record, Toulouse Street, became a breakout sensation. Producer Ted Templeman helped the band craft a sound that was organic, yet radio friendly, and brought in Little Feat keyboardist Bill Payne to add unique musical textures.

From there The Doobies hit the road, tirelessly working their way around the world. They established themselves with a breathtaking run of hits on Warner Bros. Records that tapped into a myriad of American styles. “Listen to the Music,” “Jesus is Just Alright,” “China Grove,” “Black Water,” “Rockin’ Down the Highway,” “Long Train Runnin’” and other anthemic singles confirmed their status as fine craftsman who could also rock arenas.

In 1974, Steely Dan co-lead guitarist and session legend Jeff “Skunk” Baxter joined the band as third guitarist, one of many unique and talented players who would revolve in and out of the band over the years. The group’s expanded lineup was augmented in 1975 by Michael McDonald, whose soulful vocals and songwriting led to the hits “What a Fool Believes,” “Minute by Minute,” “Takin’ It To The Streets,” and “You Belong To Me.” Multi-instrumentalist and vocalist, John McFee, joined in 1978 bringing his wide range of musical styles and experience recording with Van Morrison, Steve Miller, Elvis Costello, and The Grateful Dead to The Doobies’ sound.

The collaborative, almost communal sense of family within the band allowed them to stay fresh and unpredictable over the years, while never forsaking their deep American musical roots, boogie-jams and all.

After a respite in the early 80s, the band reunited in 1987 for a series of gigs benefiting veterans’ groups and children’s charities (ultimately raising millions). Those shows at the Hollywood Bowl were the fastest sell-outs since the Beatles had played there more than 20 years earlier. In a Los Angeles Times poll the year before, fans voted Led Zeppelin and The Doobie Brothers the bands they wanted most to see reunite.

Continuing to record, The Doobies released World Gone Crazy in 2010, produced by Ted Templeman, and Southbound on Arista Nashville in 2014. Southbound, produced by David Huff, featured new recordings of the band’s iconic hits, with country music’s biggest stars including Blake Shelton, Zac Brown Band, Brad Paisley, and Toby Keith.

The Doobie Brothers were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2004, have won four GRAMMY® Awards and sold more than 48 million records worldwide (including three multi-platinum, seven platinum, and 14 gold albums). Their 1976 Best of the Doobies has sold more than 12 million copies, earning rare RIAA Diamond status. Their No. 1 gold-certified singles “Black Water” (1974) and “What a Fool Believes” (1979) lead a catalog of hits that includes “Listen to the Music,” “Jesus Is Just All Right,” “Rockin’ Down the Highway,” “Long Train Runnin’,” “China Grove,” “Take Me In Your Arms,” Takin’ It to the Streets,” “Minute by Minute,” “You Belong to Me,” and “The Doctor.” In all, The Doobies have tallied five Top 10 singles and 16 Top 40 hits.

“We’re basically an American band – we cover a lot of areas,” says Johnston. “We cover blues, R&B, country, bluegrass, and rock ‘n’ roll. It’s based on rhythms, rhythm structures, picking, and harmonies. That’s been the signature of the band.” He continues, “You take Pat, who comes from a folk/blues background, with a lot of picking and stuff like that; he was a big fan of Rev. Gary Davis and Dave Van Ronk. I come from a blues, soul, R&B, and rock ‘n’ roll background. Then you stick John McFee into that mix. John came from a country background when he started out and was in the country band Southern Pacific. And he is a session musician – he’s played with everybody from Steve Miller to Van Morrison to Elvis Costello. If it’s got strings, he can play it.”

“We all have the same work ethic,” says multi-instrument virtuoso McFee, self-described as the “new guy.” “Tom, Pat and I are still surging ahead. We’ve stayed together as friends as well as musicians. We are compelled to challenge ourselves. I mean, I love playing the old songs. But when we’re working on new material now, I think we’re coming up with better parts. The band has always been good, so it’s kind of like we’re competing with ourselves. But honestly, we’re playing better than ever.”

Simmons notes, “We didn’t really sit around and think, ‘Oh, we need this element or that element.’ The music has always been an honest representation of whatever we happen to be working on at the time. We had all been playing music for a long time before we put the band together, and our roots influences are what come out. Those influences always overtake whatever conceptual ideas you might have. It’s always been that way with this band — you always return to who you really are.”

The ability of The Doobie Brothers’ music to connect with the essentials of people’s lives in tuneful, affecting songs has developed an audience that spans generations today. Known for their dynamic live performances, the band plays close to 100 shows a year touring worldwide, delighting concert goers of all ages.

Simmons adds, “We have a hardcore fan base that has handed our music down through the years to their children and their children’s children. Repeatedly, people go to our concerts and come up to us and say, ‘My dad turned me on to you guys years ago, and I’ve loved you guys all this time, and my kids are listening to you now.”

“And the songs that people all know, be it ‘Listen to the Music,’ ‘Black Water’ or ‘China Grove,’ are still getting played,” Johnston adds. “Any song that stands the test of time for 40 years or is getting played around the country on a daily basis – that to me is a testament to the quality of the tunes, and that they have something to say that resonates with people. I’d like to say this band has been relevant – it’s been relevant musically, it’s been relevant lyrically, and we’ve always put out a high quality of music.”

They take none of it for granted. And their music has proven to be relatable for generations since they first came together, which is why they continue to make new music. The fundamental appeal that has drawn listeners to this group for four decades may be best expressed by Simmons:

“In a certain sense, what this band has always had in common with everyone else is the word ‘hope.’ We hoped we would make some good music, and we hoped there would be some acceptance, and we hoped that things would get better in the world. In that respect, we’re just the same – we’re still hopeful about the future.”

The mere name of the band gives one hope. And it makes you think, it makes you feel and makes you appreciate the efforts of one of America’s most dependable musical outfits. It takes you back, while also helping you look ahead.
Show More
Genres:
Rock Blues, Rythem & Blues, Classic Rock
Band Members:
Tom Johnston, John McFee, Bill Payne, Patrick Simmons, Ed Toth, Marc Russo, John Cowan
Hometown:
San Jose, California

Concerts and tour dates

Upcoming
Past

Live Photos of The Doobie Brothers

The Doobie Brothers at Kelowna, BC in Prospera Place 2023
View All Photos

The Doobie Brothers merchamazonview store

Minute By Minute
$87.49
Rockin Down The Highway
$11.10
Stampede Audiophile Limited Anniversa...
$69.00
Takin' It To The Streets
$60.00
World Gone Crazy
$19.65
Best Of The Doobie Brothers Live
$7.34
Sibling Rivalry
$45.52
The Doobie Brothers Best Of
$4.28
The Very Best Of
$17.70
Brotherhood
$17.14
Best of Doobie Brothers 2
$7.19
The Captain and Me
$9.99
Cycles
$14.18
View All
The Doobie Brothers's tour

Fan Reviews

Kirk
October 9th 2023
Absolutely excellent show! These guys gave it their all and didn’t disappoint one bit! Just about every hit was played and then some plus a great version of “I Heard It Through The Grapevine” and played an incredible version of Steely Dan’s “Pretzel Logic” as the final song of the encore. This was my third time seeing them, first was for their Farewell Tour in the 80s, then about 5-10yrs ago at the Fillmore in SF. They always put on a great show and was extremely pleased to see them for what could be the last time. These guys sounded as good as ever. I would definitely go again if they are still touring. Thank you Doobie Brothers!!!
Uncasville, CT@
Mohegan Sun Arena
DAve
September 8th 2023
The Doobie Brothers: 9/6/23 “I took it to the streets rocking down the highway —destination Simpsonville South Carolina, 416 days after seeing the Doobies last in Atlanta. It was my my fifth time seeing my number 4 all-time favrite band LIVE and also my 3rd time seeing them with Michael McDonald, the first time going back to July of ’81. I’ve also seen Michael solo twice in between. An extension of the tour billed as ‘The 50th Anniversary Tour’ was now well into the fifty-second year since the release of their first album in 1971. With 15 studio albums and 32 charted singles the three frontmen who led the charge this evening were all in their 70’s: Patrick Simmons 74, John McFee 72, and the baby of the bunch Michael McDonald 71. To me it really didn’t matter how the set list would play out as I own all 15 albums and am familiar with all their songs. However much to my dismay after purchasing my tickets Tom Johnston announced that he would not be joining the band on this leg of the tour. The 75 year old voice of the majority of their earlier hits cited that he would undergo surgery to target severe back pain making it impossible. All in all, it wasn’t a dealbreaker as I’ve seen many members of the band at least one time: Johnston, Simmons, McDonald, McFee, Hossack, Knudsen, LaKind, McCracken, Weeks & Bumpus. Sadly I have missed out on seeing a few LIVE: Porter, Hartman & Baxter. I was under the expectation that I was going to see the exact same show as my 2022 Atlanta excursion this evening but was pleasantly surprised at the changes to the set. Late Summer heat described the weather at the uncovered outdoor amphitheater, however the bright sunshine quickly diffused toward evening as the daytime high of 94° began to drop. Back in May I had grabbed my general admission lawn seats during LIVE Nation’s $25 all in special, and receiving a free upgrade to row 10 at the door I made my way towards the front for a view of the stage. The stage disclosed a rather simple set up with the video screens the band typically travels with notably absent which is unfortunately a consistent happening for this venue which also have none of their own. There was a large black and gold classic logo backdrop with the wording ‘50th Anniversary Tour’, the image and wording appeared on the drum head as well. A pedal steel for ’South City Midnight Lady’ and Michael’s keys were both positioned stage left. At 7:30 p.m. the 3 members of the band from San Jose California along with 4 touring musicians took the stage for a 2 hour and 15 minute / 25 song set beginning with 1975’s #11 from their ’Stampede’ album ‘Take Me in Your Arms (Rock Me a Little While)’. Patrick took the lead on vocals as he would on ‘Long Train Runnin’ and ‘China Groove’ in lieu of Johnston and he nailed the guitar solo album perfect. The next two songs ‘Here To Love You’ and ‘Dependin’ On You’ featured McDonald on vocals. One of the things that made this show special were the additions to set list the band would not typically perform without Michael. In addition to ‘Here To Love You’ and ‘Dependin’ On You’ interdispersed throughout the evening were: ‘You Belong To Me, ‘It Keeps You Runnin’, ‘One Step Closer’, ‘Real Love’, and ‘Minute By Minute’. Next on the set was ‘Rockin' Down The Highway’, this time touring bass player John Cowan took the lead in place of Tom. Patrick addressed the audience, ‘Simpsonville South Carolina so great to be here this evening. We are the Doobie Brothers. We’re just gonna keep going we’re just kinda getting warmed up here. This is a song from an album entitled Stampede, a song called “Neal’s Fandango”’. With Cowan on lead vocals again the song featured John McFee’s exceptional pedal steel guitar skills which typically are only heard later in the set during ‘South City Midnight Lady’. McDonald arose from his keyboard for the first time and walked center stage with a mandolin in hand. Patrick announced, ‘We’re gonna do this one Hawaiian style’. With Michael positioned between SImmons and McFee the trio performed the instrumental ‘Slack Key Soquel Rag’. Pat ended the song with an exclamation of gratitude to the audience, ‘Mahalo!’ Full band Introductions followed 1973’s ‘Clear As The Driven Snow’. The touring musicians were introduced first: John Cowan 70 on bass (formerly New Grass Revival), Marc Quiñones on percussion (formerly Gregg Allman Band), Ed Toth on drums since ’05, and Marc Russo on sax. Marc a former Tower Of Power member with an impressive studio resume was granted free-range of the stage strolling from side to side energizing the crowd, his long hair blowing at the slightest breeze. Patrick then introduced John, ‘So um, John’s the new guy, he joined us in 1978’, then Michael, ‘a wonderful guy and a fabulous musician’. Michael a man of few words replied, ‘For me it’s a great thrill to be back here on stage with my old friends for fifty years now and play these songs that I’ve missed playing for s long’, then he introduced Patrick. Oddly there wasn’t a mention of Tom Johnston all evening long, as if he didn’t exist! A surprise addition since the Atlanta show followed, a cover of Gladys Knight’s ‘I Heard It Through The Grapevine’ which was actually covered by McDonald in 2003 on his solo release ’Motown’. All evening long McDonald’s uniquely-soulful vocals were strong, at times singing slightly off tempo but in clear control, establishing his own pace and direction. In retrospect, this was most likely due to years of headlining solo performances. Instead of including three brand new songs like they did on the Atlanta set, the band chose only one ‘Better Days’ from ‘Liberte’. Sounding bright and clear the song was well received with a round of applause. The band saved their earlier hits for last as the regular set began to take it’s turn towards conclusion. There was ‘Without You’ with Patrick on lead, ‘Jesus Is Just Alright’ which drew the loudest cheers of the entire evening, 1979’s #1 ‘What A Fool Believes’ and ‘Long Train Runnin' featuring John on harmonica. ‘China Grove’ ended the regular set. There was a definitive R&B feel about the songs (even the non-McDonald led ones) that one could not get from needle to vinyl alone and the audience wanted more to which the band delivered! Beginning with 1974’s #1 ‘Black Water’ the band came on for a four song / half hour encore! By now my wife Michele and I had moved our way up to the second row center stage occupying a pair of seats abandoned by a couple of patrons who had vacated at the end of the regular set! As John and Pat came up front with fiddle and guitar for the chorus, they changed up the words to the delight of the crowd, ‘Carolina moon won’t you keep on shinin’ on me’! It took an hour and forty-five minutes until the smoke from the back made it’s way up to the front. It had finally arrived and the pungent haze lingered on all throughout the encore. ‘This next song is dedicated to our good friend Jimmy Buffett, looking down on us right now, sittin’ there drinking a Margareta having a cheeseburger. We need to sing it really loud so Jimmy can hear it up there at the Cantina.’ Ensuing was a six and a half minute rendering of 1976’s ‘Takin’ It To The Streets’ that began in a jazzy keyboard and sax intro to the tune of ‘Still Crazy After All These Years’ then evolved in somewhat of a New Orleans funeral style. Bassist John Cowan once again took the lead vocals and did an outstanding job. What an honor bestowed on him to have the privilege of singing the iconic anthem! ‘Should we play one more? This is basically kind of a jam on a Steely Dan tune… all you die hards that want to stick around we’re gonna stretch this one out a little bit.’ A little bit? The song turned into a ten and a half minute rendering of ‘Pretzel Logic’ featuring guitar solos first by Pat, then John, then the two of them together ending with Pat holding his guitar over his head hammering on the the whammy bar! The night ended with a full band upfront bow and drum stick and pick toss out. We all left feeling pretty good —just as the legend of the doobie goes. Back in the 1950’s jazz clubs when one musician would call to another, ‘How you feelin’, are you doin’ good?’ The reply came, ‘I do be, I do be good!’ Inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame last year the band has stood the test of time despite line-up changes and musical styles. Who knows what will happen, will Michael stay? Amazingly until now he had only been a member a mere 7 years of the band’s history (’75-’82). One thing’s for sure, in the now, the Doobies are still very much ‘fired-up’ and it’s unlikely they’ll be hanging their instruments up any time in the near future!” Review and photo(s) by DAve (Concert #817)
Simpsonville, SC@
CCNB Amphitheatre at Heritage Park
Eddie
September 8th 2023
The show was incredible. Third time seeing the Doobie Brothers. They never disappoint. Tom Johnston was missing, but they still out in a heck of a show. White Oak Amphitheater not so much. They definitely oversold on lawn tickets. Took an hour or more for most of ticket holders to get in. If we go to this facility again, we will definitely buy seats. I like the layout, but the amphitheaters in Charlotte and Raleigh are more organized and don’t have to pay extra for parking.
Greensboro, NC@
White Oak Amphitheatre
View More Fan Reviews

About The Doobie Brothers

ABOUT THE DOOBIE BROTHERS

Born out of Northern California’s chaotic, late-1960s musical stew, The Doobie Brothers’ rugged, real and authentic approach to rock and roll made them biker bar stalwarts. But their self-titled debut album in ’71 went beyond just leather and motorcycles, revealing even more musical layers; sweet three-part harmonies and rootsy, introspective, acoustic flavors.

The Doobie Brothers’ legacy has been built upon not just hit records, but also an unrivaled commitment to musical integrity and a steadfast allegiance to their enthusiastic fan base. The bands ability to evolve in a constantly changing industry and connections to generations of listening audiences is a testament to their craft.

It all began in 1969, when a drummer named John Hartman arrived in Northern California. He was there to meet Skip Spence from the band Moby Grape and become part of a supposed band reunion that never quite got off the ground. But it wasn’t all for naught. Spence (who had also played in the Jefferson Airplane) introduced Hartman to his friend Tom Johnston, a local singer/songwriter/guitarist -and they connected. Hartman and Johnston began playing local Bay Area bars. They soon met singer/guitarist Pat Simmons, whose finger-style playing richly complimented Johnston’s R&B strumming-style, and the foundation for The Doobie Brothers was set.

While their debut album in 1971 did not chart, just a year a later, their second record, Toulouse Street, became a breakout sensation. Producer Ted Templeman helped the band craft a sound that was organic, yet radio friendly, and brought in Little Feat keyboardist Bill Payne to add unique musical textures.

From there The Doobies hit the road, tirelessly working their way around the world. They established themselves with a breathtaking run of hits on Warner Bros. Records that tapped into a myriad of American styles. “Listen to the Music,” “Jesus is Just Alright,” “China Grove,” “Black Water,” “Rockin’ Down the Highway,” “Long Train Runnin’” and other anthemic singles confirmed their status as fine craftsman who could also rock arenas.

In 1974, Steely Dan co-lead guitarist and session legend Jeff “Skunk” Baxter joined the band as third guitarist, one of many unique and talented players who would revolve in and out of the band over the years. The group’s expanded lineup was augmented in 1975 by Michael McDonald, whose soulful vocals and songwriting led to the hits “What a Fool Believes,” “Minute by Minute,” “Takin’ It To The Streets,” and “You Belong To Me.” Multi-instrumentalist and vocalist, John McFee, joined in 1978 bringing his wide range of musical styles and experience recording with Van Morrison, Steve Miller, Elvis Costello, and The Grateful Dead to The Doobies’ sound.

The collaborative, almost communal sense of family within the band allowed them to stay fresh and unpredictable over the years, while never forsaking their deep American musical roots, boogie-jams and all.

After a respite in the early 80s, the band reunited in 1987 for a series of gigs benefiting veterans’ groups and children’s charities (ultimately raising millions). Those shows at the Hollywood Bowl were the fastest sell-outs since the Beatles had played there more than 20 years earlier. In a Los Angeles Times poll the year before, fans voted Led Zeppelin and The Doobie Brothers the bands they wanted most to see reunite.

Continuing to record, The Doobies released World Gone Crazy in 2010, produced by Ted Templeman, and Southbound on Arista Nashville in 2014. Southbound, produced by David Huff, featured new recordings of the band’s iconic hits, with country music’s biggest stars including Blake Shelton, Zac Brown Band, Brad Paisley, and Toby Keith.

The Doobie Brothers were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2004, have won four GRAMMY® Awards and sold more than 48 million records worldwide (including three multi-platinum, seven platinum, and 14 gold albums). Their 1976 Best of the Doobies has sold more than 12 million copies, earning rare RIAA Diamond status. Their No. 1 gold-certified singles “Black Water” (1974) and “What a Fool Believes” (1979) lead a catalog of hits that includes “Listen to the Music,” “Jesus Is Just All Right,” “Rockin’ Down the Highway,” “Long Train Runnin’,” “China Grove,” “Take Me In Your Arms,” Takin’ It to the Streets,” “Minute by Minute,” “You Belong to Me,” and “The Doctor.” In all, The Doobies have tallied five Top 10 singles and 16 Top 40 hits.

“We’re basically an American band – we cover a lot of areas,” says Johnston. “We cover blues, R&B, country, bluegrass, and rock ‘n’ roll. It’s based on rhythms, rhythm structures, picking, and harmonies. That’s been the signature of the band.” He continues, “You take Pat, who comes from a folk/blues background, with a lot of picking and stuff like that; he was a big fan of Rev. Gary Davis and Dave Van Ronk. I come from a blues, soul, R&B, and rock ‘n’ roll background. Then you stick John McFee into that mix. John came from a country background when he started out and was in the country band Southern Pacific. And he is a session musician – he’s played with everybody from Steve Miller to Van Morrison to Elvis Costello. If it’s got strings, he can play it.”

“We all have the same work ethic,” says multi-instrument virtuoso McFee, self-described as the “new guy.” “Tom, Pat and I are still surging ahead. We’ve stayed together as friends as well as musicians. We are compelled to challenge ourselves. I mean, I love playing the old songs. But when we’re working on new material now, I think we’re coming up with better parts. The band has always been good, so it’s kind of like we’re competing with ourselves. But honestly, we’re playing better than ever.”

Simmons notes, “We didn’t really sit around and think, ‘Oh, we need this element or that element.’ The music has always been an honest representation of whatever we happen to be working on at the time. We had all been playing music for a long time before we put the band together, and our roots influences are what come out. Those influences always overtake whatever conceptual ideas you might have. It’s always been that way with this band — you always return to who you really are.”

The ability of The Doobie Brothers’ music to connect with the essentials of people’s lives in tuneful, affecting songs has developed an audience that spans generations today. Known for their dynamic live performances, the band plays close to 100 shows a year touring worldwide, delighting concert goers of all ages.

Simmons adds, “We have a hardcore fan base that has handed our music down through the years to their children and their children’s children. Repeatedly, people go to our concerts and come up to us and say, ‘My dad turned me on to you guys years ago, and I’ve loved you guys all this time, and my kids are listening to you now.”

“And the songs that people all know, be it ‘Listen to the Music,’ ‘Black Water’ or ‘China Grove,’ are still getting played,” Johnston adds. “Any song that stands the test of time for 40 years or is getting played around the country on a daily basis – that to me is a testament to the quality of the tunes, and that they have something to say that resonates with people. I’d like to say this band has been relevant – it’s been relevant musically, it’s been relevant lyrically, and we’ve always put out a high quality of music.”

They take none of it for granted. And their music has proven to be relatable for generations since they first came together, which is why they continue to make new music. The fundamental appeal that has drawn listeners to this group for four decades may be best expressed by Simmons:

“In a certain sense, what this band has always had in common with everyone else is the word ‘hope.’ We hoped we would make some good music, and we hoped there would be some acceptance, and we hoped that things would get better in the world. In that respect, we’re just the same – we’re still hopeful about the future.”

The mere name of the band gives one hope. And it makes you think, it makes you feel and makes you appreciate the efforts of one of America’s most dependable musical outfits. It takes you back, while also helping you look ahead.
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Genres:
Rock Blues, Rythem & Blues, Classic Rock
Band Members:
Tom Johnston, John McFee, Bill Payne, Patrick Simmons, Ed Toth, Marc Russo, John Cowan
Hometown:
San Jose, California

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