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Saturday, April 28th, 2018
7:30 PM
BAND OF HOLY JOY 2017
The Band Of Holy Joy 2017 model is a sleek beat outfit that owes as much to Indie music in the proper sense of Indie as it does to the Brechtian connotations of past Band Of Holy Joy incarnations. They have lineage but never dwell on it preferring to forge forward. They have a history too but never let it drag them back. For the past few years they have been quietly growing and gestating and now they have emerged fully reborn with renewed purpose of sound and vision. They have signed to Tiny Global (which is probably the best label in the world at this present moment in time in terms of roster and vision and general empathic discernment towards both band and listener) and have just released an album FUNAMBULIST WE LOVE YOU. They are a six piece of drums, bass, guitar, visuals, sixties organ and vocals, I couldn't tell you who they sound like, but they love The Subway Sect, The Jefferson Airplane, Mary J Blige, Gray, Funkadelic and the like, and when they play they possess the stage and make a beautiful racket, tell passionate tales and fill the room with light and wonder, they same to be on a mission of some sort, a mission of intent and possibilities, of old punk sensibilities honoured, and glamour in age portrayed. On a Friday night they put out a radio show called BAD PUNK which has nothing to do with any kind of new wave but is a beautiful strange mix of soundscape and poetry, very arch, sometimes a bit too sensitive, but on the stage they are a different beast, on stage they blow and howl, they they make musical bows to Funk and Soul at times and are wont to throw the odd Vincent Gallo cover version in to their set. Classically minded songs suddenly billow out into intense noise work-outs. They are quite traditional in set up but oh how the lyrics reflect these wyrd modern times we live in. That's all I can say really, other than forget old notions of what you think Holy Joy may or may not have been, whether they were any good or just terminally bad, if you like crooked style and sentient smiles, if you see the beautiful in the ugly or the happy in the sad still and just love a band intent on playing a great strange different kind of song come and see this band.



BLUE ORCHIDS
Blue Orchids have just released their latest album, The Once And Future Thing, which shows Martin Bramah's songwriting to be as strong and diverse as ever, from the powerful opener "Good Day to Live" to the delicate and sensitive "Rosy Hours" and the twisted English city blues of "Motorway." Backing Bramah live is a new band comprising John Paul Moran (Monochrome Set/Rapid Pig) on keyboards and Vince Hunt (A Witnes/Inca Babiess) on bass. They'll be performing a set filled with classics from the group's entire catalogue. The current dates mark a long-overdue return to the stage for Bramah and his mesmerising, shamanic performances.

The Once And Future Thing confirm Bramah's status as one of the Britain's most inventive and original guitarists and a superbly measured, thoughtful lyricist. Perhaps that's why Blue Orchids were chosen by Nico (Velvet Underground) to back her for several years; why his songs were covered by Aztec Camera, Sonic Youth, Dustdevils, Camper Van Beethoven, Crystal Stilts, Slovenly and many more; why he's been acclaimed by successive generations of musicians and writers for "making music which is introspective yet exhilarating, sad but stirring."

The founding guitarist of The Fall and its primary songwriter on early releases, Bramah formed the Blue Orchids with two other disillusioned Fall members after the release of the Live At The Witch Trials album - with almost instant success. John Peel championed the 7" singles "Work" and "The Flood" and had them record two radio sessions. Soon after, a high-profile tour with Echo & the Bunnymen followed. Their debut album, The Greatest Hit (Money Mountain) topped the indie charts and delivered five classics still in the set today - "Sun Connection," "Dumb Magician," "A Year With No Head," "Low Profile" and "Bad Education."

Over the years, the members of Blue Orchids came to read like a Who's Who of independent music, including members of Dislocation Dance, James, The Smiths, Primal Scream, Buzzcocks and more.

Ten years after his initial departure from The Fall, Bramah rejoined for the band's Extricate album - to date, still the band's biggest-selling album . . . and then departed again, with Mark E. Smith telling him, "You're just too good for the band!" (likely the only time a Fall member left the band with actual praise from the irascible Smith!)

Having created one of early post-punk's most distinctive sounds with their strung-out keyboards weaving around inventive, discordant guitar patterns -- once described as "Phil Spector meets the Velvet Underground beneath the Blackpool illuminations" - the Blue Orchids now move on, determined to make the world a more colourful place. The Once And Future Thing will confirm Martin Bramah as an artist who has followed his muse and continues to write great and memorable songs.


Support - Pog

Pog are a folk/punk band that set tales of everyday failure to disarmingly catchy acoustic soundtracks.

https://www.facebook.com/pogbrighton