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Friday, February 9th, 2018
8:00 PM
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Hardcore country traditionalist, Daryle Singletary, has built a career based on musical integrity.

"When I moved to Nashville in 1990, I left Georgia telling my Daddy, ‘I want to make my living in country music,'" Daryle recalls. "I didn't tell him I wanted to be played on the radio every day or be on a video channel every day. I said, ‘I want to make a living playing for the people who enjoy my kind of music.' Fortunately and thankfully, I have been able to do that since 1995.

"We've been very fortunate to stay on the road, year in, year out. I continue to work and continue to build a fan base. There are still people out there who want to hear traditional country music. I've been fortunate to be able to always keep it real and not have to compromise. I can't ask for nothin' better, I don't guess."

Daryle Singletary earned his notoriety for country authenticity with such unforgettable hits as "I Let Her Lie," "Too Much Fun," "Amen Kind of Love" and "The Note." His newest album, "There's Still A Little Country Left" , finds the country singer smack dab in the middle of what he loves the most, traditional Country music. On past albums, some of the greatest talents in his industry have lined up to sing with Daryle, including the late George Jones and Johnny Paycheck, Dwight Yoakam, Merle Haggard, Ricky Skaggs, John Anderson and Rhonda Vincent. On "There's Still A Little Country Left", Daryle finds harmony vocal assistance from Grand Ole Opry member Vince Gill on the poignant and moving "Say Hello To Heaven."

Daryle is from rural Georgia. His father is a retired postmaster and his mother is a hair dresser. They sang gospel music on weekends. By the time he reached his teens, Daryle was a rabid country music fan, enthralled by the sounds of Keith Whitley and his all-time favorite, Randy Travis.

When asked about the current state of Country Music Singletary says, There are still great country songs out there. You just have to either write them or ask the songwriting community for them... and say, ‘Look, when I say country, I mean country.' "And lucky for me, on this new CD I did both... and there are fans who still appreciate that. My fans are not fans of the bro-country movement, which doesn't bother me a bit. They're people who like it real, and that's what I give them. "Like I say, I've been very fortunate. I just wanted to make a living doing something I love to do. I'm by no means a millionaire, but I make a living singing what I love, honest country music."